Edible Art Movement @ Art Supper 2015

Here is a behind the scenes glimpse into what I’ve been doing with the Edible Art Movement recently: Our showcase at Singapore’s Art Supper 2015, in collaboration with Art Stage went down a storm, with 500 art VIP’s attending this top secret event! Below is a wonderful article written by EAM’s Katrina Broadbent:

Throughout history, depictions of food have been used by artists as a portal into place, culture and moment. Charting the intangible experiences of a land. Through the water and across the soil, over exotic contours and into nostalgic nooks; we will take you on an ephemeral adventure between food and art

On Wednesday evening, we had the pleasure of being invited to take part in a wonderful collaboration of food and art in celebration of Singapore Art Week 2015. 500 VIP guests were invited to experience the work of 8 EAM artists in collaboration with top local Chef Matthew Mok from the Rabbit Stash.

The event consisted of 4 themed tables (Nostalgia, Soil, Exotic, Ocean) which combined food and art signifying the theme and ideas that were uniquely Singapore:

EAM team
Photos by Marc Nair ©

NOSTALGIA

This table showed EAM’s interactive piece ‘may we connect you’: a food memory exchange. We gave guests a chance to write down one of their food memories on the back of a circular piece of paper containing a poem by Marc Nair. Whilst they were writing, a thread was tied around the guest’s wrists containing someone else’s food memory. This piece gave guests real insight into each other and into the real memories of food experiences. (artwork by Edible Art Movement, performed by Bernice Lee)

'May We Connect You?' by Edible Art Movement collective
‘May We Connect You?’ by Edible Art Movement collective
Jason Wee interacting with the poetry exchange
Jason Wee interacting with the poetry exchange
Honour Harger Interacting with the poem exchange
Honour Harger Interacting with the poem exchange

This table also consisted of the beautiful artwork entitled ‘Birdcage Totem’ By Nicola Anthony, which hung in a chocolate tree created by chef Matthew Mok (the Rabbit Stash) and also a customised Chinese chess board which was the base for Matthew’s Kaya toast checkers.

Chocolate tree with ‘Birdcage Totem’ – Nicola Anthony and ‘Nostalgia’ poem by Marc Nair
Chocolate tree with ‘Birdcage Totem’ – Nicola Anthony and ‘Nostalgia’ poem by Marc Nair. Photo by Marc Nair ©
Peranakan inspired chess board with Kaya toast checkers. Chess board designed by Rachel Chan Zan-mei with help from painter Sarbani Bhattacharya  Photo by Marc Nair ©
Peranakan inspired chess board with Kaya toast checkers. Chess board designed by Rachel Chan Zan-mei with help from painter Sarbani Bhattacharya
Photo by Marc Nair ©

EXOTIC

The table was glowing with Singapore’s more exotic foods. With chef Matthew Mok creating a ‘live Rojak’ performance which used local exotic ingredients. The table was brought together by artwork by Vellachi Ganesan consisting of exotic pineapple scented teabags, Poetry by Marc Nair, and a thought provoking and memorable performance by Artist Daniela Beltrani – an artist who uses materials symbolic and heavy with meaning in Singapore.

‘STOP! And smell the flowers’ By Vellachi Gabesan Photo by Marc Nair ©
‘STOP! And smell the flowers’ By Vellachi Gabesan
Photo by Marc Nair ©
‘.’ poem by Marc Nair Photo by Marc Nair ©
‘.’ poem by Marc Nair
Photo by Marc Nair ©
Rojak Station by chef Matthew Mok Photo by Marc Nair ©
Rojak Station by chef Matthew Mok
Photo by Marc Nair ©
Daniela Beltrani performing ‘Dal’ Photo by Marc Nair ©
Daniela Beltrani performing ‘Dal’
Photo by Marc Nair ©

SOIL

The food and art on this table had an earthy theme, inspired by the botanical gardens, the wonderful botanical plant-life that exists in Singapore, the smell of rain on the ground, and the sourcing of our food from the soil.  The artwork consisted of a performance by Natasha Wei who works with confined spaces, distorted beauty and dreamlike fantasy, presenting the liminal zone between painterly images and live action. This table also featured the incredible egg shell sculpture by Jana Emburey, the artwork represented little pockets of time of food movements that we consume each day, and of spaces that witnessed a life being formed. The Poem entitled ‘Petrichor’ by Marc Nair was written into the edible soil on the table

Mushrooms and Rice from ‘Horizon in Black’ by Natasha Wei Photo by Marc Nair ©
Mushrooms and Rice from ‘Horizon in Black’ by Natasha Wei
Photo by Marc Nair ©
Locally grown pickled mushrooms on edible soil Photo by Marc Nair ©
Locally grown pickled mushrooms on edible soil
Photo by Marc Nair ©
‘All is one No. 2’ by Jana Emburey Photo by Marc Nair ©
‘All is one No. 2’ by Jana Emburey
Photo by Marc Nair ©

OCEAN

Inspired by the abundant water in Singapore, the rain, the ocean and the rivers. The sea view or views of the bay represent some of the most iconic images of Singapore. There was also a more subtle theme of the pearl inside the oyster, – the wisdom, the gem, the special something, and the secret that is revealed when you look inside these precious spaces – be it an oyster shell, a street, a home, a park, or a place you explore in Singapore, there is something beautiful, flavourful, and unique hidden inside. This table was brought to life with artwork by Wyn-Lyn Tan, an installation of inked paintings suspended over a composition of mirrored ponds, and poetry by Marc Nair.

‘Inked drop’ by Wyn-Lyn Tan Photo by Marc Nair ©
‘Inked drop’ by Wyn-Lyn Tan
Photo by Marc Nair ©
Poem ‘On Silence’ by Marc Nair Photo by Marc Nair ©
Poem ‘On Silence’ by Marc Nair
Photo by Marc Nair ©

 

More about EAM:

edibleartmovement.com

https://edibleartmovement.wordpress.com/

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